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    By admin






    January 11, 2008


    Source: Audi AG




    Article Index:

    Text: Built for FunDrivetrainChassisBodyInteriorFeaturesTen Years of Audi TT

    Photo Gallery: Audi TTS Coupe & Roadster

    Video: Audi TTS Overview

    Discussion Forum: Audi TT Mk2



    The unveiling of the TTS marks something of an anniversary for Audi: It was 10 years ago that the TT Coupe first took to the road, swiftly acquiring the status of a design icon. Ever since then the TT has been going from one strength to the next, in both hard-top and open-top form.

    The prototype that was premiered by Audi at the Frankfurt Motor Show in September 1995, painted in silver gray, instantly captured the imagination of the show visitors. The strict consistency of its puristic form drew on the Bauhaus style of the 1920s. The solidly built body, the sleek glass house, the strict geometry of the shoulder line and circular arcs, the large wheels and the aluminum tank cap – all of these elements added up to deliver a new statement from Audi, the innovative technology brand. A few weeks later the Roadster appeared at the Tokyo Motor Show where it was also a tremendous hit.

    The Coupe started to roll off the production line in 1998, followed one year later by the Roadster. The shortened floor assembly of the Audi A3 proved to form an ideal base for the car – its wheel suspension endowed the TT with dynamic handling characteristics. The puristic design was also retained for the interior. Here, the classic emblem of the TT concept, the circle, had a leading role to play, featuring in the styling of the air outlets and many of the controls.

    The first TT was powered by the turbocharged 1.8-liter four-cylinder drive unit, which came in two different versions. The basic unit delivered an output of 132 kW (180 hp) and the top version 165 kW (225 hp). The more powerful engine was available exclusively with a six-speed manual transmission and quattro drive. Customers buying the basic version had the choice of either the six-speed technology again or front-wheel drive combined with a five-speed transmission.

    Audi started to expand the range of drivetrain options in 2001. First came a new version of the 1.8-liter unit generating 110 kW (150 hp), followed in 2003 by a 3.2-liter V6 developing 184 kW (250 hp). This new engine could be matched with the S tronic dual-clutch transmission as an option. The six-speed tiptronic transmission became available for the 132 kW (180 hp) four-cylinder model with front-wheel drive. In 2005, this engine’s output was increased to 140 kW (190 hp) and the power output of the entry-level unit jumped to 120 kW (163 hp). Production of the coupe and roadster versions of the first TT model series ended in 2006 and 2007 respectively.

    The equipment, specifications and prices stated herein refer to the model line offered for sale in Germany. Subject to change without notice; errors and omissions excepted.





    Article Index:

    Text: Built for FunDrivetrainChassisBodyInteriorFeaturesTen Years of Audi TT

    Photo Gallery: Audi TTS Coupe & Roadster

    Video: Audi TTS Overview

    Discussion Forum: Audi TT Mk2





     
     
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