ProjekTT Roadster: Projektzwo Body Kit Install

Whether you love it or hate it, it would be difficult to accuse the TT of lacking individuality. There is something about the shape of this car that leaves people staring and the little kids in the backs of mini-vans waving and smiling. So why are we on a mission to add plastic and polyurethane pieces to our already eye-catching TT? Simply put, we are enthusiasts and have a difficult time leaving anything alone on a car. No matter how different the TT looks from all of the other cars on the road, at the end of the day a stock TT still looks like every other stock TT on the road. We wanted something that was going to make the TT stand out from the crowd, while not going overboard; a more aggressive look that would still maintain the lines of the car.

1552 Design had been very instrumental in the creation of this Project Car owner's last automobile, so it was only natural to call them again regarding the TT. 1552 Design sent us a box full of catalogs which we poured through looking a kit that would meet our requirements.

Projektzwo is a German-based company specializing in aftermarket add-ons for several vehicles in the VW/Audi range. They made their initial mark in North America with a MK3 Golf/Cabrio body kit. With a bit of a Vittorio Strosek flare to it, it turned the boxy hatchback into an aggressive looking autobahn burner. Projektzwo now produces everything from exhausts to wheels to performance chips, but they are most widely known by VW and Audi enthusiasts as a company who makes some of the best looking body kits around.

All body pieces are wind tunnel tested resulting in a very well-integrated look. It probably also doesn't hurt that the famed Strosek studio/shop is just a stones throw away from their location. Also, because all of the parts are made of flexible polyurethane, they are less likely to shatter or crack like less expensive alternatives such as fiberglass. With the recent resurgence of Audi and VW sales, it is not surprising that Projektzwo started to look at some of the other models in the VAG lineup (New Beetle, Golf, Audi A4, A6 and luckily for us the TT) to work their styling magic.

Projektzwo's TT kit is comprised of a total of six different pieces available for both the Coupe and/or the Roadster.

Part Fits Photo
Front Spoiler Roadster / Coupe
Front Grill Roadster / Coupe
Rear Apron Roadster / Coupe with Dual Exhaust
Rear Spoiler Roadster / Coupe
Rear Deck Spoiler Coupes Only
Side Door Panels Coupes Only

If you have a pre-recall TT and do not have a rear trunk spoiler, than you may opt to add one. There are two choices available for either the Coupe or the Roadster, with one looking like the factory model and the other matching the Rear Roof Spoiler with metal brackets on the sides. Since we already had a factory-provided rear spoiler on the car, we did not think it was necessary to have the original trunk spoiler removed, filled and painted just to add another spoiler.

Upon arrival we immediately noted that the parts were ready for painting as they were already primed. We first trial fitted the pieces to make sure that everything was going to work properly and proceeded to take the parts to the local paint shop. The trial fitting turned out to be completely unnecessary because everything fit like a glove.

If you are an enthusiast not afraid to drill on your own car then you could handle installation of this kit. Alternatively most dealers or any competent body/repair show would be up to the task.

In our opinion the most difficult part of the installation is the grill because it requires removal of the entire front end in order to gain access to the backside of the stock grill. Both the stock grill and the Projektzwo grill fasten from the rear so removing the front end is simply inevitable. The good news, however, is that many members of the TT forum have already removed the front end of the car. With a little research it was easy to find documented information on the removal and reinstallation of the front end.

The Projektzwo front spoiler is attached to the bottom of the factory front fascia using 4 existing factory attachment points and 4 new holes that must be drilled in order to complete the installation. With the front end off of the car already off for the grill installation, supplied templates are used as a guide to drill the new holes. Hardware is supplied with the kit to bolt everything into place.

The front spoiler can be installed on the car without removing the front end but it requires the removal of the lower center grill and that can sometimes be tricky since it is clipped-in from the back. Using a thin enough flat head screwdriver, the lower grill can be removed without damaging any of the clips (don't ask us exactly why we know that). Once the lower grill is properly removed, access is gained to the areas where the spoiler will be attached and tightly bolted-on. Considering the scarcity of work space, given the opportunity we would recommend installing the spoiler only after the front end is already off for the grill installation.

Based on the parts we had selected the last part of the installation was the side door panels. The panels are definitely the easiest to install, as they do not require the removal of any existing pieces or new drilling. Prior to installation, however, we did thoroughly clean the body panel with prewax cleaner in order to give the heavy-duty double-sided tape a good surface with which to stick. Leaving wax the paint prior to installation will eventually cause the doubled-sided tape to absorb the wax and lose its stickiness. Installation is as simple as lining up the side sill panels with the factory lines of the factory door seams and pressing them onto the surface.

What makes the appearance of this kit so impressive is that it meets our original goals well. That is to say it that it integrates well with the designer's original lines and adds just the right amount of flare to the car. The kit also personalizes the car, making it distinctive from the average stock TT on the road.