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2005 Audi A6 Carbon Cleaning Attempt (Video)

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2005 Audi A6 Carbon Cleaning Attempt (Video)

 
Old 05-20-2019, 11:46 PM
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Default 2005 Audi A6 Carbon Cleaning Attempt (Video)

I attempted to clean carbon deposits. Things did not go as expected but the ending was a happy one.

What I learned:
The ports are very small. They are way smaller than the gaskets. Don't let pictures and videos fool you. You need tiny "metal" scraping tools that can do fast circular motions.
EDIT: Walnut shell blasting seems to be the best way to effectively remove the carbon. Check comments below.

Other things to consider:
Your lower back will start hurting after a while because of the way you are leaning towards the engine bay for long periods of time. If you have back issues, be careful.
Since the intake ports are super small, visibility inside is bad. You need some lighting to check the state of your ports.

My resources:
1. Thanks audi_bug for a very useful thread: https://www.audiworld.com/forums/a6-...clean-2764902/
2. Thanks Edge Motors for a very useful video: Youtube: watch?v=8nTNk36cHE4

Sharing my experience:
00:08 - Scanning for engine codes and decreasing fuel pressure
01:40 - Removing fuel pump fuse, starting car, letting stall
04:50 - Removing intake hose
05:40 - Removing plugs and vacuum hoses around upper intake
11:05 - Removing upper intake screws
12:30 - Pulling out upper intake
17:03 - Removing fuel lines
22:30 - Inspecting lower intake manifold flaps
23:25 - Removing lower intakes screws and nuts
29:52 - Pulling out lower intakes
35:05 - Removing intake ports dividers
36:15 - Inspecting intake ports (carbon buildup)
38:20 - Installing injectors which came out with upper intake
39:39 - Scraping intake ports and valves
40:26 - Pouring carbon cleaner into closed cylinders ports
41:11 - Inspecting lower intakes, fixing bank 1 flap
42:47 - Cleaning and scraping lower intakes (scraping not shown)
43:18 - Intake ports further cleaning

44:10 - Break - Read comments in video

45:08 - Broken cylinder 5 plug
46:50 - Installing upper intake and intake hose
57:06 - Clearing fault codes
59:26 - Going for a test drive



Replacement seals and o-rings (ECS Tuning) - I used them.




Crankshaft turning tool (eBay) - I did not use it. Reason is in the video.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Crankshaft-...53.m2749.l2649


Last edited by kelisko; 06-11-2019 at 01:29 AM.
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Sverige (06-21-2019)
Old 05-21-2019, 02:47 AM
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Thanks for the video. Were you experiencing problems with the car which made you think carbon cleaning was needed, or was it purely precautionary? Have you noticed much improvement in power, etc since completing the work?

EDIT: sorry, I really should watch the video before asking questions! I see you had a fault code for intake manifold flap stuck open.

Last edited by Sverige; 05-21-2019 at 02:57 AM.
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Old 05-21-2019, 04:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Sverige View Post
Thanks for the video. Were you experiencing problems with the car which made you think carbon cleaning was needed, or was it purely precautionary? Have you noticed much improvement in power, etc since completing the work?

EDIT: sorry, I really should watch the video before asking questions! I see you had a fault code for intake manifold flap stuck open.
Correct! The main reason why I wanted to proceed to a carbon cleaning is because I had the check engine light on and the fault about the bank 1 intake manifold flap being stuck open/closed sporadic kept coming back. I thought this was caused by a carbon buildup. I did not have any other major issue with the engine except a quick rough cold start which, now that I've been in there, I think was caused by the bank 1 flap being loose.

After completing the work, my cold starts are now flawless, rough idle is gone, the gearbox responds way better and the throttle is consistent. Great improvement!

However, I will plan the carbon cleaning again in the future, this time with the right tools. But before that, I seriously need to consider changing my cylinder head and valve cover gaskets. Bank 1 is leaking, not too bad but see the mess after 4 years of tiny leaks in my dusty and sandy environment? Ewww!

Last edited by kelisko; 05-21-2019 at 04:36 AM.
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Old 05-21-2019, 04:56 AM
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Yep, I watched most of the video now, but will go back and catch the end later. So the linkage had detached from the flap adjuster - could that have been reached without removing the whole lower manifold, or was it necessary to take it off anyway?

nice lizard on the back wall 32:26-32:46!

Overall it looked like a long and complex disassembly but nothing very difficult? Are the injector o rings a mandatory replacement or could you re-use the old ones?
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Old 05-21-2019, 05:25 AM
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I think it should be possible without removing the lower manifold. Not much room though. I might have manually pressed the actuator after installing the lower manifold to make sure it works well, but I am not too sure.

About the lizard, you have a sharp eye. I also got distracted by it while watching the video.

The old injector o-rings seemed fine to me. They were still very tight. However, the two resources I listed above recommend to change them. So I did replace them.

What you should DEFINITELY replace is the PCV valve gasket. It gets damaged when removing the PCV valve.
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Old 05-21-2019, 05:40 AM
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Thanks. I have no plans to do this job imminently, but if it becomes necessary I’ll definitely be making reference to your video.
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Old 05-21-2019, 08:51 AM
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I just finished watching the video. Definitely a few complications you encountered there and itís a shame you didnít manage to complete the clean, but hopefully youíll update the thread with pics of whatever you obtain and find to be a better tool for the job. Perhaps a small bendy bottle cleaning brush - something like these?

AKORD 4pcs Bottle Kitchen Kettle Spout Teapot Nozzle Clean Brush Set, Stainless-Steel, White, 105 x 6 x 3 cm
Amazon Amazon

or does it really have to be a scraping tool? Perhaps the cleaning fluid only softens the carbon a small amount.
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Old 05-21-2019, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Sverige View Post
I just finished watching the video. Definitely a few complications you encountered there and it’s a shame you didn’t manage to complete the clean, but hopefully you’ll update the thread with pics of whatever you obtain and find to be a better tool for the job. Perhaps a small bendy bottle cleaning brush - something like these?

AKORD 4pcs Bottle Kitchen Kettle Spout Teapot Nozzle Clean Brush Set, Stainless-Steel, White, 105 x 6 x 3 cm https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00F87Q7..._MXc5CbT42B0MM

or does it really have to be a scraping tool? Perhaps the cleaning fluid only softens the carbon a small amount.
It does have to be a scraping tool. Hard plastic will do nothing. It has to be small metal brushes. By hand, you won't achieve much. You need to attach the metal brushes to an electric gun that would turn it fast. The guy in the Edge Motors video used one.

I successfully cleaned the lower intake manifold and flap deposits using flat metal tools and a flathead screwdriver though. I did also clean the intake port dividers easily by scraping them. But the intake ports walls are a different story.

A carbon cleaner solution won't actually break down the carbon deposit which is like real hard coal. If there's anything that can break coal down without eating out the engine parts, please someone let me know. The walls in the ports are not smooth. It's like they are designed to catch the carbon dirt.

After scraping with the "electric metal brush" and vacuuming "several times", once the intake ports are clean, you may use a carbon cleaner solution and scrape the gummy parts after letting it sit for a while.

I would do this job again only if I could find the following which I did not have:

- An injector install kit because two of my injectors came out and I need to be able to properly install them the next time I get in there
- An electric metal brush with many brush options
- A vacuum cleaner with a small cord
- A power extractor
- Compressed air
- A solution that can actually break down hard carbon

Taking the car apart is not that hard. I am impressed by the design. The big deal is the scraping part.

Last edited by kelisko; 05-21-2019 at 09:32 AM.
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Old 05-21-2019, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by kelisko View Post
What you should DEFINITELY replace is the PCV valve gasket. It gets damaged when removing the PCV valve.
I just removed the tube from that valve.. When I had mine apart for replacing 1 injector.. No need to remove whole valve
🙂
I will try the walnut blasting approach when doing my valve cleaning this summer.. If my tiny compressor is up for it.. 😁

Cheers /H
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Old 05-21-2019, 11:16 AM
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Originally Posted by hrc4u View Post
I just removed the tube from that valve.. When I had mine apart for replacing 1 injector.. No need to remove whole valve
��
I will try the walnut blasting approach when doing my valve cleaning this summer.. If my tiny compressor is up for it.. ��

Cheers /H
I did not remove the valve altogether. I should have said "I removed it from the upper intake". I pulled the valve tube out of the upper intake. You can see it in the video. The gasket sits there, on the tube, between the valve and the upper intake.

I saw a video today about sand blasting. Are you referring to the method in the video below?


Last edited by kelisko; 05-21-2019 at 11:18 AM.
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