Audi Euro Delivery Program Discussion Discussion forum for Audi's Euro Delivery Program - questions & experiences

RS3 European Delivery

 
Old 05-12-2018, 06:04 PM
  #21  
AudiWorld Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 263
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Blue Smoke View Post
This is a perfect response. I really appreciate you taking the time to give me that amount of insight. I will probably modify our plans around Switzerland a bit to focus more on Zurich but based on your feedback I feel a lot more confident about our plans.

Cheers!!
Great - glad to help. Let us know how your plans shape up and trip turns out. (Happy to answer more questions too, if desired.)
zzcett is offline  
Old 05-13-2018, 02:07 PM
  #22  
AudiWorld Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 77
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by raceboy18 View Post
Even with doing a bit of research, driving in Germany "seemed" a bit daunting at first, simply because you're in an unfamiliar place with your brand new car. We stayed in Ingolstadt again that night and after dinner once the town settled down considerably, we just drove around for 30 minutes getting used to signage and everything. In no time I think you'll feel just as comfortable driving through Germany as driving in the states. Very intuitive overall.
@raceboy We're considering a drop-off in Amsterdam like you. How was your experience with this? Any issues to be aware of? Any tips?
Blue Smoke is offline  
Old 05-13-2018, 07:27 PM
  #23  
AudiWorld Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Blue Smoke View Post
@raceboy We're considering a drop-off in Amsterdam like you. How was your experience with this? Any issues to be aware of? Any tips?
Incredibly easy. Before our trip, we reached out via email (as directed by Audi) to let them know we're with Audi ED and provided an anticipated drop off time. We might've traded emails to provide documentation, I'd have to check, but regardless it was easy, standard stuff.

For the actually drop off, we came from Cologne. Drove to the port area, washed the car and went to the BLG drop off office maybe 5 minutes away. Showed up, stopped at front desk, an associate came out to inspect vehicle and complete paperwork (15 min). Completed all that and they called us a cab..... 20 minutes later we were at city center of Amsterdam. About an hour process all things considered.

Redelivery back to Minneapolis took 8 weeks, coming via truck from the Houston port. About 4 weeks into the 8 week trip, I received the email with info to track the vehicle as the ship neared u.s. ports.
raceboy18 is offline  
Old 05-15-2018, 07:16 PM
  #24  
AudiWorld Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 77
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

@raceboy thank you for the response. Sounds like Amsterdam is a good choice. It's much closer to the ring so we're thinking that Amsterdam gives us an extra city to visit without as much driving in one day.
Blue Smoke is offline  
Old 05-15-2018, 07:33 PM
  #25  
AudiWorld Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Blue Smoke View Post
@raceboy thank you for the response. Sounds like Amsterdam is a good choice. It's much closer to the ring so we're thinking that Amsterdam gives us an extra city to visit without as much driving in one day.
That was our exact thought (and a direct flight home AMS->MSP). We stayed in Cochem then drove 45 min to the Ring to hangout 5-7pm for touristfarten, then another hour drive for quick overnight in Cologne. Off in the morning for 2hr 45min dutch countryside cruise, drop off car at port and exploring Amsterdam by lunch!
raceboy18 is offline  
Old 05-16-2018, 04:58 AM
  #26  
AudiWorld Super User
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,415
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Blue Smoke View Post
This is directed @zzcett but anyone can feel free to respond.

After looking at maps and trying to balance keeping the driving distance reasonable plus reach a number of interesting locations, I think I'm going to model our trip similar to yours.

The update would look something like this.

Day 1: Munich activities
Day 2: Pick up car in Ingolstadt - drive to Salzburg
Day 3: Salzburg activities
Day 4: Alpenstrasse to Fussen
Day 5: Schloss Neuschwantstein and Hohenschwangau; Drive to Swiss Chocolate (Maestrani) Factory town
Day 6: Chocolate Factory tour. Drive towards Zurich
Day 7: Zurich activities. Drive towards Nurburgring (maybe pick a middle spot to stay)
Day 8: Ring! Drive back towards Munich (maybe pick a middle spot to stay)
Day 9: Return to Munich / Munich activities. Wash and drop off car. Depart Munich

Note: I think I have about 2 more days then what's listed so we have some flexibility based on feedback

Some questions:
Alpenstrasse:
1. I found this Google Earth KML as well as this page with a clear map (below) to start Konigsee -- but I'm having a tricky time trying to get this route into google maps such that it tells me the travel time. How long did it take to get from Salzburg to Fussen?
2. Are Schloss Linderhof and Partnach Gorge the best points of interest along the way?

Maestrani:
3. Worth the visit?
4. Did you stay near here and any recommendations?

Romantic Road:
5. Worth taking? I'm trying to balance my joy of driving fun roads vs. keeping the family happy (scenic and fast ok, tight turns and slow, not ok)

Nurburgring
6. Did you consider this?

General:
7. Are there any parts of your trip that you'd consider a *must do*?
8. Anything that you'd change?

Thanks for your input!


My wife and I have been to Germany about 25 times. Been to the Audi "home base" and taken the tour 6 times. Rented (did not buy) Audis, BMWs, and Mercedes perhaps half of the time -- used trains the other half.

Here is what we learned (to improve the quality of the trip):

Pack your luggage.
Wait 24 hours.
Figure out some way to (literally) cut the amount of what you've packed by 50%.
Many -- perhaps most -- hotels offer laundry and dry cleaning; wearing the same clothes "over and over" (with cleaning in between) isn't a problem -- the only people who know you brought two pairs of pants with you: You.

Every time you leave your hotel, throw you underwear away -- in Munich, for example, there are retail outlets that are pretty much like Walmarts, buy new underwear when you need it, the reason you are throwing out some of your clothes is in recognition of the fact that you will probably buy "something" to bring back to the US -- you'll need the space. For some reason, the clothes you bring that seem to fit just fine, "grow" as the trip progresses and it always seems you never have enough room. If you plan to wear jeans, consider going to Costco and get some jeans that, as the trip is winding down, you'll leave behind (because you want to bring souvenirs back to the US).

If you really want to "go crazy" shopping (it can happen), it is possible to have things you've purchased shipped separately back to the US -- consider doing this.

It may seem crazy, but the learnings that "finally" came to us, took a few trips:

Take half as much luggage (pack half as much) as you think you'll need; and,
Take twice as much money as you'll think you'll need.

Get a money belt and use it.

Finally, when possible, charge as much as possible on an American credit card -- the companies will get the best exchange rate on your behalf, possible.

P.S. -- you often think you can actually do more than "circumstances" permit. Immerse yourself in "the moment" -- see fewer things, do fewer things FULLY, rather than try to do many things superficially.

Best restaurant in Munich: Tantris. Tip: You can always CANCEL a reservation you already have. It is, on the other hand, sometimes impossible to get a reservation "on the fly." If you don't mind eating dinner, "where ever" you can ignore this suggestion. On the other hand, many of the really good places get booked early (just like here in the states) and thinking you can get a table at that "must do" place may not be possible. We've been able to book almost everywhere (typically for dinner) via email and, rarely have we felt we "had" to cancel a reservation. Also, some of the best restaurants (in the world) do offer lunch (and reservations are easier to get and prices are lower).

http://www.tantris.de/en/

Last edited by markcincinnati; 05-16-2018 at 05:18 AM.
markcincinnati is offline  
Old 05-16-2018, 10:13 AM
  #27  
AudiWorld Super User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 5,026
Received 16 Likes on 10 Posts
Default

^ Having family in Europe and Asia means that I travel a lot internationally, so I agree with the travel light mantra, but please don't be this wasteful and take stuff to Europe just to throw it away there. I know we live in a throw away society, but please don't be that person.

Also, no need to take money with you. Your ATM card works anywhere in Europe. You'll get the best exchange rate by just taking money out of an ATM as you need it. I agree with charging things to your credit card, but you'll find that Europe is less of a credit card society than America, so always have cash on you. Leave your American Express at home, too. You'll get farther with Visa/MasterCard.
superswiss is offline  
Old 05-16-2018, 11:39 AM
  #28  
AudiWorld Super User
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 4,415
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by superswiss View Post
^ Having family in Europe and Asia means that I travel a lot internationally, so I agree with the travel light mantra, but please don't be this wasteful and take stuff to Europe just to throw it away there. I know we live in a throw away society, but please don't be that person.

Also, no need to take money with you. Your ATM card works anywhere in Europe. You'll get the best exchange rate by just taking money out of an ATM as you need it. I agree with charging things to your credit card, but you'll find that Europe is less of a credit card society than America, so always have cash on you. Leave your American Express at home, too. You'll get farther with Visa/MasterCard.
Super (and to the OP), I agree about the ATM comment -- and, if you have set up everything with your US financial institution, even withdrawing money will be carried out with the best possible exchange rate. The issue you can sometimes come across is a need for "cash NOW" -- I have a "belt loop" money/card holder. I keep my passport in the "pouch" (unless I have surrendered it at the hotel.) I also keep two credit cards in the pouch, and I've typically charged the hotel's fees on an AMEX. Our experience is that AMEX (I have the Platinum Card) goes to bat for you when needed. Moreover, my wife got very sick in Munich and AMEX helped me cover the fees and the RX. Otherwise, I use Visa or MC.

Prior to travel, you should call your CC companies and let them know when/where you're going. This is not, per se, a requirement -- however, I had my Visa "declined" until the clerk at the store in Belgium handed me the phone and I spoke to the Visa operator, answered some security questions and then bought the sport coat I had selected. It turned out, you need to set an "alert" that is either higher than $500 or take the phone calls if you splurge. I also bought an Omega watch in Venice, same deal with the phone call. I set my cards at $500, seems a safe approach. With AMEX and a hotel bill at Hotel Bayerischer Hof, Munich, you can get to a bill over $1,000 pretty easily, but AMEX doesn't do the phone call thing (IF you have notified them while you are stateside that you will need an "override" for your European hotel adventures).

While you're at it. Make copies of BOTH SIDES of your CC's -- and, your passport -- most hotels have a safe (many in-room) and you can store your documents (the copies) there. Never really had any issues in Europe other than in Amsterdam, but since my pockets are ALWAYS empty, all that happens is someone else puts his hands in your empty pocket and moves on to the next "prospect."

Back to the throwing stuff away. In the pedestrian walkway in Munich called Marienplatz there is, believe it or not, a Woolworth's (blast from the past). Fruit of the Loom (or the German look-alike) is quite inexpensive. We were so determined NOT to check any luggage, we (my wife and I and another couple) we each took ONE carry on bag with a couple pairs of pants a couple shirts and brand new packs of underwear and socks (they're really compressed in the package) from "Champion" (Costco). We availed ourselves of the laundry/dry cleaning facilities at the various Hotels but literally threw away the undergarments and purchased new ones every couple of days. We were able to "live out of" a carry on and still have some room for souveniers. Not living in Europe and despite somewhat regular trips, well, "we never knew" when our next trip would be so we "made space" any way we could. This meant: two pairs of shoes (or one if you thought you could handle it) one on your feet and one ("running shoes") in the luggage. On one of our trips, our companion's packed jeans, dress pants, sport shirts, dress shirts, a suit (and tie) dress shoes, casual shoes, and items for every possible contingency. Their luggage had to be checked. We flew into Rome. We had a connection that was 40 minutes -- of course we missed it since getting the luggage was at least 30 minutes. We had asked that our friends (first timers) pack light. Everywhere we went -- including on trains -- was an issue. Although when we went to Tantris, I was in slacks and a sport shirt with loafers and they were dressed formally. Just like here, some patrons are dressed to the nine's and some are pretty casual. What seems to matter is "can you pay the bill?" Not how you're dressed (within some rational limits of course.)

The first two or three trips to Germany, I felt we saw "everything" -- which means, we saw very little in any depth. Perhaps one (or two) days in Prague is enough for you -- and it can be done -- but WHY would you do that? If the purpose of the trip is to drive the new car, well there is nothing wrong with that. A possible alternative might be to pick a city as your "base" and made day trips from the base, then you can come and go and linger or rush when YOU WANT TO, not because you've got to check in or check out between the hours of X and Y, and so forth.

If you like (and I think you will) Bavaria, Munich is a great place to "base" out of -- but another alternative might be to check into basing out of Garmisch-Partenkirchen (and you can drive to and from Munich on the Autobahn with several stretches of no speed limit.) If you go there, you can go up into the Alps (see three countries at once, woo woo!) and stay at Hotel Reindls Partenkirchner Hof which has one of the best restaurants I've ever been to (hotel site: https://www.reindls.de/ )

From Garmisch you can take the train (or the cable car) to the top of the Zugspitze (for the day), you can motor over to Neuschwanstein Castle in Schwangau (for the day), or you can go into Austria (take the train this time) and spend the day in Innsbruck. All over this area of Bavaria (and Tyrol) you are likely to find ski lifts running that will take you to breathtaking vistas. There will still be snow on the Zugspitze and you can spend some time at the home of the 1936 Winter Olympics in Garmisch -- you can take a ski lift up to the top of the ski jump area (where there is a bar!)

There's just so much to do in such a small part of the country and the beauty is beyond stunning.

I rented a Mercedes E class (diesel) at Avis in Munich (they required two credit cards each with over $10,000 of "free" credit -- the AMEX really came in handy there) and drove it from Munich to Garmisch on the Autobahn and then I drove it on the coolest backroads ever back to Munich whereupon I took the train to Verona, IT -- the route through Germany and Austria are off the charts beautiful. I would love to drive from Garmish to Verona -- especially in a new Audi. This is the stuff of bucket lists.

I guess one of the things I am suggesting is that, to me, your itinerary seems overly aggressive -- not that I fault you for wanting to do a lot and drive your new car a lot. I don't see very much "time" to savor if I may opine. On the other hand, there is absolutely nothing wrong with drinking a cup of coffee created from a K-cup, but compared to a great cup of coffee from a French Press or some painstakingly made espresso (especially in Italy), well the difference isn't "slight."

You're going to be close enough to Switzerland that you can make a day trip (without rushing) to Lucerne -- a small but exceptional city that I would think could be the stuff of some great memories. Of course, if you're in Lucerne and not worried about getting back to your hotel late, you could drive about 2 to 3 hours to St. Moritz. Audi sent us there along with 50 other couples for three days -- and put us up in Badrutt's Palace Hotel. If you wanted to "abandon" Garmisch, you could do a heck of a lot worse than spending a couple of nights in Badrutt's Palace (no kidding a REAL palace).

I've perhaps overstepped.

This sounds like a fantastic trip and perhaps your first or one of your firsts to Bavaria and some absolutely memorable, impressive, and glorius sights, experiences, and FOOD! The fact that you'll be able to drive your new Audi will be the icing on one of the best cakes available on our planet.


Regarding the trip: Do less, do everything a little bit slower (except when you're on an unrestricted part of the Autobahn) -- you'll get so much more out of the trip.

If you don't like the "concept" of throwing some of your clothes away -- GIVE them away instead. Or, you could do what we did last time (we flew business class), we took an empty carry on which allowed us to "wear our underwear and keep it too!" Well, I'm sure you get my drift.

Last edited by markcincinnati; 05-16-2018 at 11:48 AM.
markcincinnati is offline  
Old 05-16-2018, 01:55 PM
  #29  
AudiWorld Super User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 5,026
Received 16 Likes on 10 Posts
Default

One more comment on credit cards. Most banks do no longer require that you let them know about traveling if you have a chip card. Make sure you have one. It will simplify life. Europe has had chip cards for nearly a decade now. The USA is way behind. Europe also uses what's called chip and PIN and not chip and signature. For certain purchases you may need a PIN, for example many gas stations in Switzerland are not staffed. Some are staffed during the day, but not at night. You will only be able to fuel up your car with a credit card if you have a PIN, unless the station is staffed. I've got myself in a situation once where I was in the middle of nowhere and couldn't get gas. I ended up managing to the Autobahn and the nearest rest stop, which are generally staffed 24x7. Call your CC company and get a PIN just in case. You may also wanna look into a CC card that doesn't charge a foreign transaction fee. Capital One is known for not charging foreign transaction fees which normally run around 3% with other CCs. I have a Capital One Visa that I mostly keep just for overseas travel. It has a chip and PIN and never had any issues with transactions being declined, other than when I bought something online like airplane or train tickets while in Europe. Basically transactions where you don't have to show the CC get flagged immediately, but thanks to the chip, in person transaction generally don't raise a flag. Capital One also sends fraud alerts by text, so to unlock the card all you have to do is reply with the correct option confirming that it was you who made the purchase. Saves you from having to make an international phone call or figure out how to place a collect call.

Last edited by superswiss; 05-16-2018 at 02:05 PM.
superswiss is offline  
Old 05-16-2018, 05:24 PM
  #30  
AudiWorld Senior Member
 
chicagoA6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Chicago, IL USA
Posts: 817
Received 3 Likes on 3 Posts
Default

I'll concur with superswiss on the itinerary. Our first trip over a few years ago for a Euro delivery I planned to hit multiple alpine passes each day, blast from Munich to Zurich in 3 hours, then blast from Lucern to Salzburg in 5. Needless to say on the 3rd day my wife laid down the law and suggested (code for demanded) that we slow down a enjoy the trip.

She was right and we still had fun, but would stop every so often take pictures, have a snack and just take it all in. One of the best experiences was we spend a couple hours at the top of Grossglockner (Austria) just having some wine and enjoying the day when a classic car rally drove by. For an American its not often you see Renault Alpines, classic Bugattis, a Porsche 904, a Zonda and the list went on.

Enjoy the trip, but take the time to enjoy it
chicagoA6 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: RS3 European Delivery


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: